Light Grids Reliable Measure Product Dimensions

Contrinex unveils its infrared MGI series measuring light grids to the industrial sensor market. The light grids are said to provide a sure, simple, and automatic way of determining product dimensions. Due to advanced design and productivity features, objects that have different surface properties can now be detected with increased reliability in relatively short reaction times.  

 

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Grids are available for different measuring ranges up to a maximum measuring height of 56.6 inches (1438 mm). Their housing cross-section is 1.6 X .807 inches (40 x 20.5 mm). Due to a special technology of parallel and intersecting beams, the central measuring range has a maximum resolution of .24 inches (6 mm). Where lower accuracy is specified, a variant with a central beam spacing of .47 inches (12 mm) and a resolution of .55 inches (14 mm) is available. Response times are between 4 and 14 ms, depending on the measuring height and beam distance.

 

Measuring range (position or dimension of object) is set via switches. If two light grids are installed at 90° to each other, the height and width of an object can be measured. Its length can then be derived from the running speed of the belt. In this way, all dimensions of an object can be determined automatically and with very little effort. For more info and datasheets, checkout the MGI Series product page.

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