Industrial Cameras Enlist Sony CMOS Sensor

Camera maker IDS now offers the modular Ensenso X 3D camera system with high-resolution 5 MP

industrial cameras featuring the IMX264 CMOS Sony sensor. Compared to the currently available 1.3 MP

sensors, they allow for an expanded field of view, higher resolution, and lower noise levels.

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The Ensenso X 3D camera system consists of a 100W, to which two cameras can be mounted at variable distances. Applications range from factory automation (e.g. Bin Picking) to warehouse and logistics automation (e.g. pallet picking). Both 5 MP cameras and an updated software development kit are available now.

 

Thanks to the larger field of view of the 5 MP sensors, for example, the distance between the camera system and object can be reduced. To completely capture a packed Euro pallet with a volume of 120 cm x 80 cm x 100 cm, 1.25m instead of 1.5m is required. The Z-accuracy improves from 0.43 mm to 0.2 mm.

 

Further advantages of the new models include an increase of up to 35% in lateral resolution with

more than 30% lower noise. With the new Ensenso X models users can choose between compact GigE uEye CP cameras and robust GigE uEye FA cameras with IP65/67 protection class – in just the same way that is possible with the 1.3 MP systems. The new cameras use the GigE Vision standard to communicate with the pattern projector. This eliminates the need for an additional installation of the IDS Software Suite. For further details, peruse the Ensenso X product page.

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