HOYA Brings Highly Accurate 3D Vision Simulation to Stores

UITHOORN, The Netherlands -- HOYA introduces its latest innovation: the HOYA Vision Simulator offers wearers the ability to experience their lenses before they buy them, right in the store. Using wearers' actual prescription, the HOYA Vision Simulator provides a highly accurate, 3D vision experience, visualising the optical effects of the various lens designs and treatments. HOYA erases the line between virtual reality and individual reality, giving wearers the opportunity to choose the lenses and treatments that work best for them.

How does it work?

The HOYA Vision Simulator is easy to use, hygienic and ready for high-traffic usage. It is controlled by an application downloaded onto a smartphone that is placed into the headset. Wearers look through the headset and see a virtual environment. Opticians apply the wearing parameters and exact prescription (every prescription type and cylinder is accommodated) and adjust for accurate pupil distance. A tablet serves as a remote control. Opticians decide what wearers see and experience, and can demonstrate and explain the different options available.

The simulator enhances customers' shop experience by offering the opportunity to 'see before they buy'. This makes the final choice for lenses and treatments simple, accurate and tangible, increasing trust and overall satisfaction.

Call for beta-testers

Opticians are invited to be among the first to use the HOYA Vision Simulator in their stores. Through the dedicated website, http://www.hoya-vision-simulator.com/, opticians can register their interest. Ten will be selected as beta-testers. Their testimonials will be shared on the website, along with general information, updates and news about the device.

For more info, visit
http://www.hoya-vision-simulator.eu
http://www.hoyagallery.com

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