How to Update Your Systems to Manage Compliance with New REACH Obligations in the Electrotechnical Industry

BATH, England -- Companies' obligations to inform their customers about 168 REACH Candidate List Substances of Very High Concern (SVHC) in their products changed on 10 September 2015 following the European Court of Justice (ECJ) ruling. Companies now have to inform their customers if any articles in their products contain an SVHC > 0.1% by weight of the article, instead of by weight of the product, and provide information on safe use according to European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) new guidance published 17 December 2015.

Join the free webinar on Tuesday 16 February to understand the impact on companies and their supply chains in the electrotechnical industry and receive best practice recommendations from RoHS Ready Managing Director Jim Kandler on how to update your systems to manage compliance. Prior to founding RoHS Ready, Jim led the GE Healthcare compliance program to collect supplier declarations for 250,000 parts for RoHS, REACH and other substance regulations. His team set up company-wide procedures and loaded declarations into several leading in-house IT systems.

You will also hear how Siemens, Philips, GE Healthcare and other leading companies have used BOMcheck to implement ECHA recommendations to:

•share chemicals knowledge to screen out 95 SVHC substances which are not relevant to the electrotechnical industry
•establish supply chain communication standards and systems to collect information on safe use from suppliers.

The webinar on 16 February will start at 10.00am US Eastern Time, 4.00pm in central Europe and registration is available at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4474705933617996033

For more details, visit:
http://www.bomcheck.net
http://www.rohsready.org

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