High-Temperature Inductor Relishes Extreme Environments

Vishay Intertechnology introduces an IHLP low-profile, high-current inductor in the 1616 case size that combines a high operating temperature to +155 °C with a profile of 2 mm for commercial and industrial applications in extreme environments. With a frequency range up to 2 MHz, the Vishay Dale IHLP-1616BZ-51 is optimized for energy storage in DC/DC converters and high current filtering up to the self-resonant frequency (SRF) of the inductor (see table below). Applications include notebooks, desktop PCs, and servers; low profile, high current power supplies, PMICs, and point of load (POL) converters; industrial and telecommunications power systems; and DC/DC converters for distributed power systems and FPGAs.

 

The device released today features high efficiency with typical DCR from 4.0 mΩ to 102.0 mΩ and a wide range of inductance values from 0.10 µH to 4.7 µH. The IHLP-1616BZ-51 provides rated current to 19.0 A and handles high transient current spikes without saturation.

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Samples and production quantities of the new inductor are available now, with lead times of 10 weeks for large orders. Pricing for U.S. delivery only in 10,000-piece quantities begins at $0.50 per piece. For more details and a datasheet, go to http://www.vishay.com/ppg?34438

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