Hearing Aid Boasts Better IoT Connectivity

Semtech and Sonova have developed an advanced radio system using an ultra-small integrated circuit (IC) for a new generation of hearing aids, enabling support for multiple radio protocols in the 2.4-GHz band, as well as effective operation on very low power.

 

“This chip allows Sonova to move in a new direction with our hearing aids,” said Marc Secall, Director Research & Development Wireless at Sonova. “The breakthrough radio technology and power management are the game changers for hearing aids. It allows them to support several applications that have previously not been possible in a hearing aid, all at low power consumption and low supply voltage. Possible applications span from connectivity to any Bluetooth® enabled audio device (e.g. a smartphone or television) to full duplex audio streaming between hearing aids and connectivity to wireless microphones.”

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“Semtech continues to innovate and create flexible, reliable solutions for challenging applications associated with the best radio frequency connectivity at the lowest power and 0.8V supply voltage,” said Jean-Paul Bardyn, Vice President of Research and Development of Semtech’s Wireless and Sensing Products Group. “Sonova has long been a leader for hearing devices. By implementing Semtech’s technology and enabling access to the Cloud, we believe that these devices will enrich the IoT-connected solutions which Semtech is serving with LoRa Technology.”

 

For more details, visit Sonova and Semtech.

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