Frost & Sullivan Applauds CMT Vector Network Analyzers' High Performance and Small Form Factors

MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA -- Based on its recent analysis of the vector network analyzer (VNA) market, Frost & Sullivan recognizes Copper Mountain Technologies (CMT) with the 2015 Global Frost & Sullivan Award for Competitive Strategy Innovation and Leadership. CMT's VNAs stand out for their high performance in a smaller form factor at much lower prices than existing mid-range network analyzers. While leading mid-range VNAs are too big, heavy, or expensive to be portable, CMT's VNAs can be easily transported and deployed in remote locations.

"The small form factor of CMT's VNAs makes them particularly well suited for field applications, such as antenna testing, enabling customers to bring laboratory-grade instruments to hard-to-reach places," said Frost & Sullivan Industry Director Jessy Cavazos. "Their compactness and low weight also make them ideal for applications in the manufacturing industries, as they enable more machines to be deployed in plants. With CMT's VNAs, customers get the additional benefit of instantaneous data transfer, as the VNA and the handler are in the same operating system."

The company offers compact as well as full-size instruments. Its patent-pending Planar R54 and R140 reflectometers deliver up to 100,001 measurement points, time domain with gating standard, fixture simulation, and have a frequency range of 85 MHz to 5.4 GHz or 14 GHz. Its compact VNA product line includes the TR1300/1, 5048, and 7530 models for applications ranging in frequency from 20 kHz to 4.8 GHz, and a dynamic range of up to 135 dB.

Its full-size VNA product line includes four models: Planar 304/1, Planar 804/1, Planar 808/1, and Planar 814/1. These VNAs have a 19-inch chassis and range in frequency from 100 kHz to 8 GHz. The 304/1 model has a dynamic range of 140 dB, while the other three provide 150 dB.

In May 2015, CMT extended its product line with the introduction of Cobalt, which includes two models, the C1209 and the C1220. The Cobalt units have an impressive price-performance ratio, a frequency range of up to 9 or 20 GHz, a dynamic range of 145 dB, and measurement speed of 15 or 10 µs. These models feature a unique combination of fast measurement time, wide dynamic range, small size, and affordable price. Although there are lower-priced products in the market, CMT offers the best value as it does not compromise performance. Even cost-conscious customers have opted for CMT's products after comparing them with competing solutions.

One of the innovations that enabled CMT to dramatically cut the costs of these instruments is the removal of the computer normally included in leading VNAs. This move preempted potential challenges as computers evolve quickly and may develop hard drive, display, or memory issues. Moreover, it significantly shrunk the size of the device; this is a substantial benefit because a large number of customers need to perform testing at the test point.

Furthermore, the company has developed its own algorithms and has a metrology group that ensures the devices have high precision, accuracy, and stability. Temperature stability and measurement accuracy were top priorities for the development team during the design process. Today, CMT channels a large portion of its revenue to its development process to enhance the functionality of existing products based on the feedback from customers.

"While every VNA user benefits from CMT's innovation, the biggest beneficiaries are those that have limited financial resources," observed Cavazos. "These customers also have a higher requirement for support than larger companies, and CMT addresses these requirements. Evidently, CMT's purpose goes beyond selling a box to the customer."

Each year, Frost & Sullivan presents this award to the company that has leveraged competitive intelligence to successfully execute a competitive strategy that results in stronger market share, competitive brand positioning and customer satisfaction.

For more information, visit:
http://www.coppermountainech.com
http://www.frost.com

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