Free Advice on Sensors for Defense

We now face a new concept of war where instead of being miles away, the enemy may be in the same building or just a few feet away," says David Shumaker, director of SENSIAC, the new sensing information analysis center serving the U.S. Department of Defense.

The center draws expertise from Georgia Tech (where it is housed) and seven other universities, and serves everyone from university researchers to soldiers in the field. "We provide information on all sensing-based technologies related to defense activities," says deputy director Ann Batchelor. The service is free—unless the problem requires extensive research—and welcomes all types of questions. Contact Shumaker, 404-385-7370, [email protected]; or Batchelor, 404-385-4032, [email protected]

Sponsored by Digi-Key

Analog Devices ADIS16500/05/07 Precision Miniature MEMS IMU Available Now from Digi-Key

The Analog Devices’ ADI ADIS16500/05/07 precision miniature MEMS IMU includes a triaxial gyroscope and a triaxial accelerometer. Each inertial sensor in the MEMS IMU combines with signal conditioning that optimizes dynamic performance.
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