Float Level Transmitter Is Chemical Resistant

MPX-E chemical magnetostrictive float level transmitter features a chemical- and corrosion-resistant coating and promises accurate and dependable level measurements in places where stainless steel doesn't measure up. The chemical resistant coating is designed for use in corrosive, acidic, and marine environments, such as sulfuric acid, boric acid, hydrochloric acid, sodium hydroxide, and sea salt water. Like other MPX probes, the MPX-E Chemical carries both CSA Class I Division 1 and Class I Division 2 approvals. The component supports a single float with either a 4 mA to 20 mA output or Modbus with lightning protection and optional temperature output. Its probes with Modbus output also function as Tank Cloud slave sensors. Other features include a stem length from 1 ft. to 12.75 ft., an accuracy of ±0.05% of full scale, a NEMA 4X/IP65 rated housing, and CSA Class I Division 1 and Class I Division 2 approvals. A datasheet is available at https://www.apgsensors.com/continuous-float-level-transmitters/corrosion-resistant-magnetostrictive-float-level-transmitter

 

Automation Products Group Inc.

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