Flexible Waveguide Models Trim VSWR

Fairview Microwave’s latest line of seamless and twistable flexible waveguides cover 10 frequency bands from WR-137 to WR-22 and operate in the 5.85 GHz to 50 GHz range. Typical applications include base stations, DAS systems, antennas and test instrumentation.

 

The waveguides consist of 78 models, 39 seamless and 39 twistable, all operating in the same wide range of frequencies. All models are offered with UG-style square/round cover and CPR-style flanges and are available in lengths of 6 to 36-inches.

Sponsored by Anritsu Company

New VNA technologies enable mmWave broadband testing to 220 GHz, helping researchers and engineers to overcome test challenges and simplify mmWave testing.

Application development in the mmWave frequencies is growing. Broadband testing over hundreds of GHz of bandwidth is subject to repeatability/accuracy deficits, and engineers demand solutions to help overcome challenges and simplify mmWave testing.

 

The models are constructed of a solid piece of brass that is pressed into shape. These flexible waveguides deliver VSWRs as low as 1.07:1, max power as high as 5 kW, insertion loss as low as 0.06 dB, and can be used in pressurized applications.

 

The twistable models are made with twist-flex material that is wound, interlocking brass which allows it to slide on itself, making it able to twist in different directions. These flexible waveguides provide max power as high as 1.5 kW, insertion loss as low as 0.15 dB and VSWR as low as 1.05:1.

 

Fairview Microwave’s new flexible waveguides are in stock and ready for immediate shipment with no minimum order quantity. For detailed information, checkout the datasheet and/or call 972-649-6678.

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