First 7-Axis Motion Sensors Can Take The Pressure

Deemed a market first, TDK unveils the InvenSense ICM-20789 MEMS 7-axis integrated inertial device combining a 3-axis gyroscope, 3-axis accelerometer, and an ultra-low noise MEMS capacitive barometric pressure sensor. The component encompasses a single small footprint, with reportedly the industry’s lowest pressure noise of 0.4 PaRMS and reliable temperature stability with a temperature coefficient of ±0.5 Pa/°C.

 

The low temperature coefficient of the ICM-20789 enables the temperature stable capacitive pressure sensor to measure extremely small pressure differences of ±1Pa, enabling the ICM-20789 to detect altitude changes of less than 5cm. This industry leading pressure noise performance enables improved drone altitude-hold and a more accurate tracking of altitude changes for wearables, navigation, and fitness applications.

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TDK’s latest high-performance 6-axis motion sensor inside the ICM-20789 integrates the most granular tracking of rotational and linear motion and simplifies the fusing of sensor signals. The motion and pressure sensor integration enables a fast implementation for a wide range of applications including activity monitoring for wearables, gesture recognition for AR/VR and gaming applications, and step/stair counting for fitness applications.

 

For more specs, an ICM-20789 datasheet is available. For more info, visit InvenSense.

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