Dialog Semiconductor Enters Gallium Nitride (GaN) Market With First Integrated Devices Targeting Fast Charging Power Adapters

London, United Kingdom --- Dialog Semiconductor plc is demonstrating its first gallium nitride (GaN) power IC product offering, using Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Corporation’s (TSMCs) 650 Volt GaN-on-Silicon process technology.

The DA8801 together with Dialog’s patented digital Rapid Charge™ power conversion controllers will enable more efficient, smaller, and higher power density adapters compared to traditional Silicon field-effect transistor (FET) based designs today. Dialog is initially targeting the fast charging smartphone and computing adapter segment with its GaN solutions, where it already enjoys more than 70 percent market share with its power conversion controllers.

GaN technology offers the world’s fastest transistors, which are the core of high-frequency and ultra-efficient power conversion. Dialog’s DA8801 half-bridge integrates building blocks, such as gate drives and level shifting circuits, with 650V power switches to deliver an optimized solution that reduces power losses by up to 50 percent, with up to 94 percent power efficiency. The product allows for a seamless implementation of GaN, avoiding complex circuitry, needed to drive discrete GaN power switches.

The new technology allows a reduction in the size of power electronics by up to 50 percent, enabling a typical 45W adapter design today to fit into a 25 Watt or smaller form factor. This reduction in size will enable true universal chargers for mobile devices.

The DA8801 will be available in sample quantities in Q4 2016. More information on the DA8801 may be found at http://www.dialog-semiconductor.com/products/DA8801

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