CUI Global Enables the Next Gen Innovators as a Supplier for the FIRST® Robotics Competition

TUALATIN, OR -- CUI Global, Inc. announces that its wholly-owned subsidiary, CUI Inc, has joined forces with FIRST® (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) as a supplier of the FIRST®2015 Robotics Competition (FRC®). FIRST is a not-for-profit organization founded by inventor Dean Kamen to inspire young people's interest and participation in science and technology.

CUI donated its innovative and flexible AMT103-V encoder kits for the FRC playing field and the 2015 FRC Kit of Parts which was distributed to nearly 2,400 teams of high-school students on January 3, 2015.

"The mission of FIRST is to inspire young people to pursue careers in the science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields. As a supplier, CUI provides tools that aid in experiential learning and allows FIRST to offer participants a glimpse of what it is like to be a real engineer," said FIRST President, Donald E. Bossi.

By providing components for the competition, FIRST Suppliers are putting the latest technology into the hands of students, giving them the opportunity to apply the same tools used by professional scientists and engineers and, ultimately, helping them learn real-world skills they will carry into the workplace.

"CUI is proud to again support the FIRST competition and to provide the participants with our flexible AMT103-V incremental encoder kits," stated Jeff Smoot, VP of Motion Control at CUI. "Our donation to FIRST is seen as a long-term investment in the future of our engineers and we are excited to give participants a hands-on experience with our industry leading products," Smoot concluded.

To learn more, visit
http://www.usfirst.org
http://www.cuiglobal.com
http://www.cui.com

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