Compact E-Paper Displays Do Mellow Yellow

Pervasive Displays latest line of compact e-paper displays (EPDs) range in size from 1.54 in to 4.37 in. and can display text and images in yellow, as well as black and white. The EPDs open fresh opportunities to enrich user experiences. Applications for the yellow tri-color displays include shop shelf labels, where yellow can be used to draw attention to special offers and price reductions. Shipping tags can incorporate yellow to highlight priority items. Corporate identification and access control badges often use one color for employees, another for contractors and another for visitors. EPDs enable these cards to be digitized, to include the person’s name and other details, with yellow EPDs used for one group, and black-and-white, or black, white and red EPDs for others. 

Available in 1.54-, 2.13-, 2.66-, 4.2- and 4.37-in. models, the active-matrix displays include an internal timing controller, which minimizes the amount of programming and peripheral circuitry required. This results in a slimline display unit, and consequently a smaller overall device footprint.  

Pixel density ranges from 111 dpi to 140 dpi, depending on the screen size. As key capabilities are pre-programmed into the display, they can be driven without consuming resource from the host controller. More information is available at Pervasive Displays for each model: 1.54-inch (E2154GS093), 2.13-inch (E2213GS091), 2.66-inch (E2266GS094), 4.20-inch (E2417GS054), and the 4.37-inch (E2437GS083).

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