CCD Image Sensor Boosts Resolution For Industrial Apps

ON Semiconductor’s 29-Mpixel KAI-29052 image sensor provides up to twice the imaging sensitivity of the existing KAI-29050 in the wavelength range of 500 nanometer (nm) to 1050 nm. This improved performance is particularly beneficial to applications operating in near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths, such as 850 nm. This enhanced pixel design retains isolation of charge from one photodiode to another, enabling this increase in sensitivity without any reduction to image sharpness (Modulation Transfer Function, or MTF). In addition, an improved amplifier design reduces read noise by 15%, increasing the linear dynamic range available from the device to 66 decibel (dB). With these enhancements, the KAI-29052 serves as a new performance benchmark for high resolution image capture.

 

The KAI-29052 is now available in a RoHS-compliant CPGA-72 package in Monochrome, Bayer Color, and Sparse Color configurations, and is fully pin compatible not only with the existing KAI-29050 image sensor but also a full family of 5.5 micron and 7.4 micron CCD image sensors, enabling camera manufacturers to quickly adopt the new device.

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Evaluation kits for ON Semiconductor’s full family of Interline Transfer CCD image sensors are now available, allowing the performance of devices such as the KAI-29052 to be examined and reviewed under real-world conditions. For more information, visit http://www.onsemi.com

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