Automated Flammable Gas Sensor Improves Safety, Lowers Ownership Cost

NevadaNano’s MPS Flammable Gas Sensor is said to be the first gas sensor of its type able to accurately detect, quantify, and classify a broad array of flammable or explosive gases using a single calibration. The component is also able to measure the concentration of flammable and combustible gas mixtures and it can classify detected gases and mixtures into hydrogen, methane, or light/medium/heavy gas. 

 

The MPS Flammable Gas Sensor requires significantly less power than catalytic bead-based sensors, while delivering accurate detection of hydrogen and other hydrocarbons not detected by NDIR flammable gas sensors. NevadaNano also claims its sensor has a lower cost of ownership than catalytic bead type sensors. The MPS Flammable Gas sensor will not "poison" or stop working when exposed to common industrial chemicals, eliminating the need for frequent, costly manual calibrations. Even more important, workers can count on the reliability of the MPS Flammable Gas sensor to continuously ensure a safe workplace.

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NevadaNano will offer the sensors in two industry standard form factors. The Series 7 MPS Flammable Gas Sensor (32 mm x 13.8 mm) is available for evaluation now; the Series 4 (20 mm x 16.5 mm) sensors are expected to be available for evaluation in December 2018. For more information, visit NevadaNano.

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