Automated Flammable Gas Sensor Improves Safety, Lowers Ownership Cost

NevadaNano’s MPS Flammable Gas Sensor is said to be the first gas sensor of its type able to accurately detect, quantify, and classify a broad array of flammable or explosive gases using a single calibration. The component is also able to measure the concentration of flammable and combustible gas mixtures and it can classify detected gases and mixtures into hydrogen, methane, or light/medium/heavy gas. 

 

The MPS Flammable Gas Sensor requires significantly less power than catalytic bead-based sensors, while delivering accurate detection of hydrogen and other hydrocarbons not detected by NDIR flammable gas sensors. NevadaNano also claims its sensor has a lower cost of ownership than catalytic bead type sensors. The MPS Flammable Gas sensor will not "poison" or stop working when exposed to common industrial chemicals, eliminating the need for frequent, costly manual calibrations. Even more important, workers can count on the reliability of the MPS Flammable Gas sensor to continuously ensure a safe workplace.

Fierce AI Week

Register today for Fierce AI Week - a free virtual event | August 10-12

Advances in AI and Machine Learning are adding an unprecedented level of intelligence to everything through capabilities such as speech processing and image & facial recognition. An essential event for design engineers and AI professionals, Engineering AI sessions during Fierce AI Week explore some of the most innovative real-world applications today, the technological advances that are accelerating adoption of AI and Machine Learning, and what the future holds for this game-changing technology.

 

NevadaNano will offer the sensors in two industry standard form factors. The Series 7 MPS Flammable Gas Sensor (32 mm x 13.8 mm) is available for evaluation now; the Series 4 (20 mm x 16.5 mm) sensors are expected to be available for evaluation in December 2018. For more information, visit NevadaNano.

Read more on

Suggested Articles

One forecast from Cameron Chell: the best AI designers of the future won’t come from top universities


Survey of 30 chipmakers offers a good sign for research and development of self-driving vehicles, analyst says

Research dollars for AV are expected to remain, if slowed, especially for companies that see self-driving as a key to their success