AOI System Brandishes Dual MRS Sensors

CyberOptics Corp. unveils the SQ3000-DD 3D automated optical inspection (AOI) system with two multi-reflection suppression (MRS) sensors. The dual lane, dual sensor system is an extension of the SQ3000 3D AOI platform, deemed and reported as a best in class system.

 

The SQ3000-DD 3D AOI maximizes flexibility by catering to varying PCB widths. This design provides the ability to inspect high volume assemblies, the convenience of inspecting different assemblies and board sizes simultaneously on different lanes, or even switching from dual lane to single lane mode to inspect very large boards.

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The system also provides the flexibility to choose two of the same or two different proprietary MRS sensors, both of which meticulously identify and reject multiple reflections caused by shiny components and reflective solder joints. The MRS sensor option provides an even finer resolution than the standard, delivering better inspection performance ideally suited for 0201 metric and microelectronics applications where an even greater degree of accuracy and inspection reliability is critical. The unique architecture of both MRS sensor options simultaneously captures and transmits multiple images in parallel, while highly sophisticated 3D fusing algorithms merge the images together, delivering microscopic image quality at production speed. For more information, visit the company’s website.

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