Analog Magnetic Sensors Get Smaller, More Sensitive

Coto Technology’s latest RedRock RR111 Series wafer-based tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) analog sensors boast extremely strong magnetic sensitivity in an ultra-miniature package size at a highly-competitive price. The RR111 analog sensor is viable for liquid level sensing, precision linear proximity detection, linear positioners and encoders and anti-tampering applications. Available in both a 1.4 mm x 1.4 mm x 0.45 mm LGA-4 device package and an industry standard SOT-23-3 package, the sensor fits well into space-constrained applications such as insulin management, ingestibles, and implantable devices that all need to be hermetically sealed. With its high sensitivity, the RR111 operates continuously, changing its output voltage based on the applied magnetic field strength. The highly linear response of the RR111 provides reliable functionality with a wide range of magnets across wide activation distances.

 

The RedRock RR111-1DC2-331 and RR111-1DC2-332 TMR analog magnetic sensors are available at a single unit price under $1.00 with high volume application pricing below $0.25. For greater enlightenment, peruse the RR111 datasheet.

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