3D Transponder Coils Exhibit High Sensitivity At 22 kHz

TDK extends its B82453C*A* series 3D transponder coils with a unique component that features an operating frequency of 22 kHz. The B82453C0335A022 complements the company’s existing spectrum designed for a frequency of 125 kHz and is suitable for automotive passive entry passive start (PEPS) and other access systems based on the lower frequency.

 

The B82453C0335A022 also offers high inductance values of 30 mH, 33 mH, and 55 mH, respectively, for the x-, y- and z-axes. This results in higher sensitivity values of 25.5 mV/μT for the x- and y-axes, and 23.3 mV/μT for the z-axis. These are the world's highest sensitivity values for 3D transponder coils and are about 20% higher than those of existing products with comparable dimensions and inductance values.

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Additionally, the 22-kHz coil is RoHS-compatible and measures 11.5 x 12.5 x 3.6 mm. Due to its plastic overmolding and laser-welded connections the component is mechanically very stable. Accordingly, these transponder coils are qualified to AEC-Q200. For further information, checkout the TDK transponder page for a veritable treasure trove of datasheets.

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